Art Reviews for DCist

At The Hirshhorn’s Marcel Duchamp Exhibit, Viewing The Pieces Makes You Part Of The Art

From or by Marcel Duchamp or Rrose Sélavy (The Box in a Valise) (De ou par Marcel Duchamp ou Rrose Sélavy [Boîte-en-valise]), 1935–1941/1963. Photo courtesy Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

In a comprehensive new exhibition, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden traces the career of 20th century artist and provocateur Marcel Duchamp. Marcel Duchamp: The Barbara and Aaron Levine Collection features the recent gift of more than 50 works of art that have been promised to the museum by Washingtonians Barbara and Aaron Levine.

The Hirshhorn exhibition, which opened Saturday, is a reverent display of work that was created with the utmost irreverence for institutions of fine art. For decades, Duchamp held onto his resentment towards such institutions after having his work rejected in two significant ways. The first rejection came in Paris in 1912.

As the story goes, Duchamp submitted his painting “Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2” to the Salon des Indépendants. The painting was poorly received by other members of the salon, who represented Cubism, and felt the painting slanted too far towards Futurism—a rival artistic movement. They asked Duchamp’s brothers, also salon members, to have Duchamp replace his painting with a substitution. The 25-year-old Duchamp refused, took his painting home, and renounced his membership.

Read the full article at DCist.

National Museum Of Women In The Arts’ Exhibit Lets Local Artists Of Color Tell Their Own Stories

DMV Color, a new exhibition featuring contemporary works of book art, highlights women of color connected to the local region, while also showcasing the D.C. area as fertile ground for the book arts.

With approximately 20 artists’ books, graphic novels, photobooks, and zines on display in National Museum of Women in the Arts’ fourth floor library, DMV Color includes both widely-known artists—such as Elizabeth Catlett and Loïs Mailou Jones—and lesser-known creators.

“The impetus was just feeling like we wanted to shine a spotlight on book arts in the DMV and shine a spotlight on the creative endeavors of women of color,” says Lynora Williams, director of the Betty Boyd Library & Research Center. “It’s somewhat understated the extent to which, for women of color, this is a very fertile area that sparks a lot of creative work, and it’s also an area that’s important for book arts.”

Read the full article at DCist.

Summer Music Festivals Set Sights on Waste Diversion

outside-lands.jpg

Outside Lands in San Francisco. Photo courtesy Outside Lands

Summer music festivals bring out huge crowds of people who celebrate, revel and generate tons of waste. To make these multi-day events more sustainable, across the country, several festivals have committed to making waste diversion part of the package.

Several festivals across the country have committed to making waste diversion part of their events. Read the full article at Waste360.

Willona on Wax: Hozier & The Fugees

I love reviewing vinyl for AudioFemme. This month, I reviewed Hozier’s self-titled release and The Fugees’ re-release of The Score. Check out the reviews here.

Hozier
Hozier

hozier-album-coverThe first time I heard Hozier’s breakout (and Grammy-nominated) single, “Take Me to Church” I was sleeping. I woke as if from a beautiful dream, jumped out of bed and went to my computer. I needed to know what the song was before it slipped away.

Although I found out that the Irish singer/songwriter’s debut album was due out in the fall of 2014, I put off buying it because I was afraid I would be disappointed. I finally purchased the album on vinyl a couple of days ago, opened it, took a breath and listened.

I am not disappointed.

Read the full review.

 

 

Fugees
The Score

“How many mics do you rip on the daily?”

FugeesThis is really happening. The Fugees’The Score is almost 20 years old, people. It’s a vintage classic.

When I went to buy the Hozier record, I came across this re-release in the crates. Let’s just say it wasn’t cheap, but as I debated whether or not to take it home I realized that I hadn’t heard the full album since my tape player died. So, I bought the record.

Read the full review.

 

Literary Happenings: New Short Story & Poem

I am excited about two recent publications!

Of Matches & Men (fiction)
My short story (4,500 words) was published in Issue 5 of Words Apart, a social-justice themed publication from Emerson College.

Leffler_-1968_WashingtonDC_MLK_riotsThursday, April 4, 1968. 7:05 p.m.

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is shot in the neck as he stands on the balcony of Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee.

Thursday, April 4, 1968. 10:56 p.m. U Street, NW, Washington, DC.

A man standing in front of a drug store balls up a wad of paper.
He lights a match to the paper.
He throws it inside.

Thirty years later the fire was still burning and crackling through the air.

For Ángela, the young mother of an 11-year old boy, her only wish is to protect her son from that raging fire.

 

Untitled (queen) (poetry)
I published a poem in the fall issue of BlazeVOX.
Yippee! Read it here.

UVA Alumni Spotlight

I am very excited! I just published an essay about  my Writing with Willona series in the University of Virginia alumni e-newsletter. You can read “Writing Better Together”  here.

Writing Better Together

by  WILLONA M. SLOAN willona sloan_headshot

“I think what we need is more literature in bars.”

It felt like Andre Perry, co-founder of the Mission Creek Festival in Iowa City, was speaking just to me. He wasn’t.

Perry was addressing the packed room of writers gathered at a literary conference in Washington, D.C., and espousing on the topic of literary community. “If you see a gap,” he said, “Then fill it.”  The lesson: build the community that you want to participate in.

Perry was right.

We did need more literature in bars.

Read the full article.